A Tortilla Is Like Life: Food and Culture in the San Luis by Carole M. Counihan

By Carole M. Counihan

Located within the southern San Luis Valley of Colorado, the distant and comparatively unknown city of Antonito is domestic to an overwhelmingly Hispanic inhabitants suffering not just to exist in an economically depressed and politically marginalized region, but in addition to maintain their tradition and their lifeways. among 1996 and 2006, anthropologist Carole Counihan accumulated food-centered existence histories from nineteen Mexicanas—Hispanic American women—who had long-standing roots within the higher Rio Grande quarter. The interviews during this groundbreaking learn serious about southern Colorado Hispanic foodways—beliefs and behaviors surrounding nutrients construction, distribution, coaching, and consumption.

In this e-book, Counihan beneficial properties vast excerpts from those interviews to offer voice to the ladies of Antonito and spotlight their views. 3 traces of inquiry are framed: feminist ethnography, Latino cultural citizenship, and Chicano environmentalism. Counihan records how Antonito's Mexicanas determine a feeling of position and belonging via their wisdom of land and water and use this data to maintain their households and groups. girls play a massive position via gardening, canning, and drying greens; making a living to shop for nutrients; cooking; and feeding relatives, acquaintances, and buddies on usual and festive events. They use meals to solder or holiday relationships and to specific contrasting emotions of concord and generosity, or enmity and envy. The interviews during this ebook show that those Mexicanas are inventive companies whose meals paintings contributes to cultural survival.

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A Tortilla Is Like Life: Food and Culture in the San Luis Valley of Colorado (Louann Atkins Temple Women & Culture)

Positioned within the southern San Luis Valley of Colorado, the distant and comparatively unknown city of Antonito is domestic to an overwhelmingly Hispanic inhabitants suffering not just to exist in an economically depressed and politically marginalized sector, but in addition to maintain their tradition and their lifeways. among 1996 and 2006, anthropologist Carole Counihan accumulated food-centered existence histories from nineteen Mexicanas—Hispanic American women—who had long-standing roots within the higher Rio Grande zone.

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Extra resources for A Tortilla Is Like Life: Food and Culture in the San Luis Valley of Colorado (Louann Atkins Temple Women & Culture)

Sample text

Some people identified themselves as “Chicana/o,” a term that entered the vocabulary in the 1960s and 1970s when Mexican Americans adopted it to indicate a politicized view of their people. ” Teddy Madrid spoke of the early 1970s: “I remember hearing that some of the students had started calling themselves Chicanos; they were not Mexicans. What we had known as la gente, la raza, los mexicanos, the Hispanic, you know? ” Teddy said that she identified herself as Hispanic or Spanish American on the census.

When I talk to outsiders, right away when they find out you’re from Antonito, they have a negative [response], because they don’t know if they like you. We’re not seen as very civilized. They’re afraid of us, and their perception is that this is a lawless place. It was a place to come for dances in the past, and people got into a lot of fights. Even though people fight over here, a lot, and every time you turn around somebody is mad at somebody, or jealous of somebody, they’re not usually violent.

In Alamosa, since I lived there almost year-round, I had lots of friends there. I remember some of the girls were Protestants, and they invited me to their programs, like the Protestants have, the Presbyterians had programs, and the Catholics at that time didn’t have anything for the young. They’d invite me to go with them, and Mother wouldn’t let me. At that time we were raised each religion like separate. Now I know better, but in those days, that’s the way it was. But we were friends. [My hair was] light brown, a very light brown.

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